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ISIS and the Zombie Apocalypse

In the opening of George Romero’s cult classic Night of the Living Dead (1968), a young man and woman are driving through a desolate countryside to a visit a cemetery.  As Barbara and her brother Johnny are laying a cross wreath on their father’s grave, they are stalked by an old man who lurches awkwardly toward them, a twisted look on his face.  After the man attacks Barbara, Johnny tries to defend her and is killed.  Then the maniac chases Barbara to an old farm house, where she finds refuge with another man, Ben, who kills several zombies before boarding up the house and trying to save them from a growing horde of the undead that is surrounding the house and trying to break in.  Later, when a mass of zombies attack the house, Barbara is killed by her dead brother. 

Night of the Living Dead embodies one of the darkest themes in human pop culture—the living pursued by the dead, isolated and nearly defenseless against an unreasoning enemy we don’t understand whose sole aim is to kill us or devour our flesh.  Ghouls, vampires, werewolves, demons, zombies, and the gigantic nuclear creatures of the 1950’s—in our collective nightmares, they are the instruments of our destruction, monsters who attack without provocation, as powerful and soulless as they are uncompromising and devoid of humanity.  Among our fears, we fear the unfamiliar and the irrational.  We fear losing our freedom and our sense of well-being.  We fear being pursued by forces stronger than ourselves.  We fear not knowing where safety lies.  In short, we fear threats we do not understand and cannot control.

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About Terry R. Bacon

Terry R Bacon

I am retired but still actively working on my websites.  I have recently completed a novel called Storm Warning and am working through the process of getting it published.  While that is happening, I am at work on my next novel.

I was born in Topeka, Kansas in 1947 and grew up in Missouri and Iowa. I graduated from Treynor High School (in southwestern Iowa) in 1965 and did my undergraduate work at the United States Military Academy at West Point. I was in Company E2 and graduated with a BS in General Engineering in 1969. Shortly thereafter, I spent a year in Vietnam with the 101st Airborne Division and then several more years as a military intelligence officer. I left the Army in 1974 and went to The American University, Washington, DC, where I received a PhD in Literary Studies in 1977.

I moved to Utah after graduation, taught briefly as an adjunct professor at the University of Utah, and then joined a consulting company, Shipley Associates, where I became the vice president of research and development. I created a number of corporate education programs while at Shipley and co-authored, with Larry Freeman, the Shipley Associates Style Guide, which was published by John P. Wiley & Sons. In 1989, I left Shipley and founded Lore.

Besides providing leadership at Lore and doing considerable client work, I developed dozens of executive education programs and authored or co-authored the books featured on this site. I also continued my own education by studying strategic planning at the Wharton School of Business (University of Pennsylvania), sales management at the University of Chicago, leadership at Stanford University, psychology at Goddard College, and leading professional services firms at the Harvard Business School.

For nineteen years, I was the president and CEO of Lore International Institute, which I founded on July 1, 1989. Lore was a professional and executive development consulting firm that focused on the assessment, education, and coaching of professionals, managers, and executives around the world. As Lore grew, we formed a sister company in Europe and eventually had a global network of more than 300 faculty and coaches to serve primarily Fortune 500-type clients. In 2008, Lore was acquired by Korn/Ferry and is now part of one of the world’s largest talent management firms.

I have been active on the boards of a number of nonprofits, including the Women’s Resource Center in Durango, Colorado; the advisory board of the Durango Arts Center; the advisory board of Friends of the Fort Lewis College Theatre; the board of Music in the Mountains (where I served as president for two years); and the Fort Lewis College Foundation Board (where I served as chairman for three years).  I am currently president of the board of the Durango STEAM Park, whose mission is to build a Science, Theatre, Education, Arts, and Music cultural park in the City of Durango.

In 2011, Amacom Books published two of my books:  Elements of Influence: The Art of Getting Others to Follow Your Lead, appeared in July 2011.  It is a companion to The Elements of Power: Lessons on Leadership and Influence, which appeared in January 2011. Together, these books present nearly two decades of research on power and influence.  Both of these books have been translated into Chinese, and Elements of Influence is now being translated into Estonian.

In 2012, Nicholas Brealey published my latest book (coauthored with Dr. Laurie Voss):  the 2nd edition of Adaptive Coaching, which initially appeared in 2003.

 

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image of a penHow to contact me...

Email: terry@terryrbacon.com
Websites: www.terryrbacon.com, www.theelementsofpower.com

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